Language.

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Re: Language.

Postby Tamar » Fri Nov 30, 2012 6:01 pm

mikbuster wrote:Is there a word for 'lightheadedness' in other languages?


In Hebrew, "lightheaded," in the sense of "dizzy," is סחרחר (səḥarḥar). The "h"s are guttural, as in "Ḥanukkah."

"Lightheaded" in the sense of "flippant" or "featherbrained" is קל דעת (kal da`at) or קל ראש (kal rosh).
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Re: Language.

Postby Rowan Hawthorn » Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:18 pm

The idiomatic confusion can occur even from locale to locale here in the US. For instance someone might ask "Would you go into town and pick up some groceries?". In southeastern Kentucky, where I'm from, the other person might answer "I don't care to do that", and be perfectly understood as meaning, "I don't mind", while in other places, it would be understood as a (fairly blunt) refusal. I'n't language fun?
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Re: Language.

Postby Valerie » Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:02 pm

Rowan Hawthorn wrote:The idiomatic confusion can occur even from locale to locale here in the US. For instance someone might ask "Would you go into town and pick up some groceries?". In southeastern Kentucky, where I'm from, the other person might answer "I don't care to do that", and be perfectly understood as meaning, "I don't mind", while in other places, it would be understood as a (fairly blunt) refusal. I'n't language fun?


See, here I am in Northern Kentucky and I thought it meant you didn't want to get groceries. XD
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Re: Language.

Postby Captain LeBubbles » Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:11 pm

Valerie wrote:
Rowan Hawthorn wrote:The idiomatic confusion can occur even from locale to locale here in the US. For instance someone might ask "Would you go into town and pick up some groceries?". In southeastern Kentucky, where I'm from, the other person might answer "I don't care to do that", and be perfectly understood as meaning, "I don't mind", while in other places, it would be understood as a (fairly blunt) refusal. I'n't language fun?


See, here I am in Northern Kentucky and I thought it meant you didn't want to get groceries. XD


That's what would be implied here as well.

What's more, around here ("here" being middle Georgia), if someone asks if you don't mind doing something, you would think the answer would be no ("no, I don't mind") but answering no would imply that no, you don't want to do that. However, if someone asks if you mind them doing something, you would think the answer would (by the preceding logic) be yes (go ahead), but saying yes would imply yes, I mind if you do that. What gets even more confusing is this is only true half the time, and it's impossible to tell which people follow which. The general solution (mine, anyway) is to respond 'sure, just a second' (or whatever, to imply consent), or "nah, go ahead" (or whatever, to imply consent) (or vice versa, of course).
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Re: Language.

Postby svenman » Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:20 pm

Val,

thanks for starting this topic. I'd thought about starting a similar topic myself, back when it came out that Trefle's language uses the same word for "taste" and "feel", but I never got around to do it.

Seems that great minds think alike, though.


Still don't have the time to comment on everything here, but I'm reading it with great interest.

[ Edit: arglblargl feel, not smell ]
Last edited by svenman on Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Language.

Postby Rowan Hawthorn » Thu Dec 06, 2012 9:55 am

Valerie wrote:
Rowan Hawthorn wrote:The idiomatic confusion can occur even from locale to locale here in the US. For instance someone might ask "Would you go into town and pick up some groceries?". In southeastern Kentucky, where I'm from, the other person might answer "I don't care to do that", and be perfectly understood as meaning, "I don't mind", while in other places, it would be understood as a (fairly blunt) refusal. I'n't language fun?


See, here I am in Northern Kentucky and I thought it meant you didn't want to get groceries. XD


Personally, I could care less (sic)... :) On the other hand, don't get me started on the uses and misuses of "ain't" and "ha'n't", double and triple negatives, and such oddities as "plaskit" for "plastic", obscure archaisms of foreign extraction like "gaum" for "mess", and the use of "-y" sounds where words end in "-a" ("Santy Claus" being a wide-spread example). :lol:
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Re: Language.

Postby Alice Macher » Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:32 am

Rowan Hawthorn wrote:("Santy Claus" being a wide-spread example). :lol:


Ha, so there are people who say that in real life? I remember Yosemite Sam (as Ebenezer Scrooge) saying it that way in Bugs Bunny's Christmas Carol:

BUGS (disguised as GHOST): Because you're a mean and low-down man with no Christmas spirit, I am taking you to see the man in the red suit.

SAM (grinning): You mean Santy Claus?

BUGS: No. I mean the other guy in the red suit.
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Re: Language.

Postby Lia S » Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:38 am

Rowan Hawthorn wrote:such oddities as "plaskit" for "plastic"


Well, if you’re going to use “aluminum” for “aluminium”...
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Re: Language.

Postby Rowan Hawthorn » Thu Dec 06, 2012 3:43 pm

Lia S wrote:
Rowan Hawthorn wrote:such oddities as "plaskit" for "plastic"


Well, if you’re going to use “aluminum” for “aluminium”...


"Aluminum" came first. Of course, "alumium" came before either, so we're all wrong... :D

http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2008/ ... inium.html
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Re: Language.

Postby Rowan Hawthorn » Thu Dec 06, 2012 4:16 pm

Alice Macher wrote:
Rowan Hawthorn wrote:("Santy Claus" being a wide-spread example). :lol:


Ha, so there are people who say that in real life?


Yep. Quite a few, actually, although it used to be more common than it is today. For example, see Gene Autry's original recording of "Here Comes Santa Claus" (1948). You'll hear it said that way in lots of old movies and TV shows, too. I suspect that pronunciation is probably an early form of the derivation from Saint Nicholas ("Saint-ni-clas").
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Re: Language.

Postby Valerie » Thu Dec 06, 2012 5:48 pm

Rowan Hawthorn wrote:
Alice Macher wrote:
Rowan Hawthorn wrote:("Santy Claus" being a wide-spread example). :lol:


Ha, so there are people who say that in real life?


Yep. Quite a few, actually, although it used to be more common than it is today. For example, see Gene Autry's original recording of "Here Comes Santa Claus" (1948). You'll hear it said that way in lots of old movies and TV shows, too. I suspect that pronunciation is probably an early form of the derivation from Saint Nicholas ("Saint-ni-clas").


This reminded me of the days of the week, too. A lot of southern types seem to pronounce them with an "ee" sound at the end instead of and "ay" sound. Sundy, Mondy, Tuesdy, Winsdy, Thursdy, Fridy, Saturdy.
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Re: Language.

Postby mikbuster » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:29 pm

I'm surprised you guys haven't gotten into the old soda, pop, and coke discussion. I thought that was one of the more popular things :P
Then again I think it's funny how the meaning of 'dinner' changes depending on who you talk to :D
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Re: Language.

Postby Valerie » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:37 pm

mikbuster wrote:I'm surprised you guys haven't gotten into the old soda, pop, and coke discussion. I thought that was one of the more popular things :P
Then again I think it's funny how the meaning of 'dinner' changes depending on who you talk to :D


It's soda. End of discussion. =_=

When I lived in Indiana, everyone called it "pop." And I was like NO IT IS SODA WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE.
I don't know how I got so attached to "soda," though, since my entire family says "coke."
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Re: Language.

Postby Alice Macher » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:44 pm

It's "soft drink," and that's that. Harrumph!
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Re: Language.

Postby mikbuster » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:51 pm

lol, I usually go with pop myself. I believe soda pop is also acceptable :wink: I never understood calling it coke, but I guess it's probably the same reason for what we normally call bandages.

Now I'm going to sit here and sip my soda that I got with dinner and laugh at the thought of word choices bothering people :P

I should probably mention that when we read books written in dialect in school I was the only one that could understand it :)
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